CKG19 Nominations

Though the dust has barely settled after the excitement of the Carnegie and Greenaway medal announcements in June, we’re already busy thinking about what we’ll be nominating for the 2019 awards. Our marvellous committee met up to discuss the books that have caught our attention over the past few months…

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After much discussion we came up with two shortlists of books to be read over the summer months. If you’d like to read along with us you can find our shortlists below.

We will be holding a discussion day in September looking at how our shortlists measure up against the Carnegie and Greenaway criteria  and selecting the two books from each list we think are most worthy of being nominated.

It is also worth bearing in mind that all CILIP members can make nominations in their own right. Eligible titles must be published between 1 September 2017 and 31 August 2018. You can read more about eligibility for the awards on the Medal’s website.

 

Carnegie Shortlist for Nominations

  • Moonrise – Sarah Crossan
  • The House With Chicken Legs – Sophie Anderson
  • Notes On My Family – Emily Critchley
  • Satellite – Nick Lake
  • The Poet X – Elizabeth Acevado
  • Orphan Monster Spy – Matt Killeen
  • The Hazel Wood – Melissa Albert

Greenaway Shortlist for Nominations

  • Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets: A Muslim Book of Shapes – Mehrdokht Amini (Hena Khan)
  • The Lost Words – Jackie Morris (Robert Macfarlane)
  • The Last Wolf – Mini Grey
  • Space Tortoise – David Litchfield (Ross Montgomery)
  • Rebel Voices: The Rise of Votes For Women – Eve Lloyd Knight (Louise K Stewart)
  • Suffragette: The Battle for Equality – David Roberts
  • The Squirrels Who Squabbled – Jim Field (Rachel Bright)

 

 

CKG Review: Wed Wabbit by Lissa Evans

Continuing with our series of reviews of the Carnegie and Kate Greenaway 2018 shortlisted titles, today our newest Committee member Alex shares her thoughts on Wed Wabbit by Lissa Evans, from the Carnegie list.

What the publisher says…

Wed Wabbit is an adventure story about friendship, danger and the terror of never being able to get back home again.

And it’s funny. It’s really, really funny.

http://www.davidficklingbooks.com/shop/ItemDetails.php?pubID=163

Wed Wabbit Lissa EvansWhat we say…

Initially I was sceptical about reading Wed Wabbit, as it not ordinarily the kind of book I would choose to read. I was pleasantly surprised, Wed Wabbit is fantastical and funny. After her sister Minnie is injured in an accident, Fidge finds herself trapped in an imaginary world of the Wimbley Woos, the characters from Minnie’s favourite book. She must solve a series of clues and overcome the tyrannical dictator, Minnie’s favourite toy Wed Wabbit, all with the help of a giant plastic carrot, a toy elephant and her strange cousin Graham. More than being fantastical and funny, Wed Wabbit is also a story about a young girl moving on and growing up in life too, as the experience positively alters her outlook on life.

Alex

 

See Lissa Evans talk about Wed Wabbit on the CKG shadowing site: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/watch.php?id=18

Check out the full CKG shortlists here:

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/carnegie-current-shortlist.php

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/greenaway-current-shortlist.php

 

CKG review: Where the World Ends by Geraldine McCaughrean

Looking for some bank holiday / half term reading? If you haven’t already read them all, the Carnegie and Kate Greenaway shortlists are a brilliant place to look for inspiration.

Today we continue on our mission to review all the shortlisted titles for each award before the winners are announced on 18th June. Here Ros reviews Where the World Ends by Geraldine McCaughrean, from the Carnegie shortlist:

What the publisher says…

Every summer Quill and his friends are put ashore on a remote sea stac to hunt birds. But this summer, no one arrives to take them home.

Surely nothing but the end of the world can explain why they’ve been abandoned – cold, starving and clinging to life, in the grip of a murderous ocean. How will they survive?

https://usborne.com/browse-books/catalogue/product/1/11571/where-the-world-ends/

where the world ends

What we say…

Full disclosure – I am not a huge fan of Geraldine McCaughrean’s work as a whole. She’s a writer I appreciate, rather than enjoy, and so I was a bit trepidatious about reading this. I even had another book with me ready for when I gave up on it!

I did not give up on it. In fact, I could barely put it down. This story of a group of boys (and a few men) abandoned on a remote sea stac is full of tension and perhaps even more importantly, takes the time to develop the characters so that I genuinely cared about their fate. There are moments of humour amongst the grind of survival and when events took a bad turn at various points, I found myself almost holding my breath (and holding back tears).

This is based on a true story, although of course the actual events on the sea stac are fictionalised. McCaughrean manages to create an ending that feels almost like a beginning – full of hope for the future, but the author’s note about the actual reason for the group’s abandonment is devastating.

Ros

Watch Geraldine McCaughrean speaking about Where the World Ends on the CKG shadowing site: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/watch.php?id=11

You can view the full Carnegie and Kate Greenaway 2018 shortlists here:

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/carnegie-current-shortlist.php

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/greenaway-current-shortlist.php

CKG Reviews: Rook by Anthony McGowan

Continuing with our series of reviews of the CKG shortlisted titles, today Amanda gives her verdict on Rook by Anthony McGowan, from the Carnegie list.

What the publisher says…

When Kenny and Nicky rescue a rook left for dead, Kenny is determined to keep it alive. Nicky doubts the scruffy bird will make it, but then Nicky has plenty else to worry about – a school bully, his first love, and the fact that everything is about to go very, very wrong.

https://www.barringtonstoke.co.uk/books/rook/

rook

What we say…

I have to admit, when I saw Rook was on The Carnegie Shortlist I was a little skeptical. It was a Barrington Stoke book and I always believed them to be much easier reads without much substance (this was of course because I hadn’t read any!)

The first two pages did put me off a little as it described the birds fighting, but as soon as Kenny and Nicky came flying onto the page I thought – I’m going to enjoy this.

I loved the way Nicky looked out for his brother and really felt his pain when he was dealing with his issues. I feel a true testament to how powerful the writing was, was me thinking – if I was at the school I would sort out those boys!  And having to remind myself – its not real.

The topics were all dealt with sensitively and with realism and I would highly recommend this book to every student as it was very relatable.

Even though it was the third one about the boys it didn’t make the story incomprehensible, it simply made me want to read the earlier novels, Brock and Pike, which I now have.

One of my students in the shadowing group stated she liked it as it was realistic the way the school children were with each other but she was confused where mum was. I have suggested she reads the others.

A great read.

Amanda

You can see what Anthony McGowan has to say about Rook on the Carnegie shadowing site: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/watch.php?id=1

CKG 2018 Nominations Announced

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It’s always an exciting day when the Carnegie and Kate Greenaway nominations are announced. It marks the first step in an extraordinary reading journey that will take us all the way to the announcement of the winners in June next year.  Moreover, it’s a wonderful insight into the books that fellow librarians have been reading and recommending and with a total of 237 books nominated across the two awards this year there’s no doubt that we’ve got a couple of months of outstanding reading ahead.

Over the last couple of years I’ve inadvertently developed my own ritual for nomination announcement day: after printing a nice crisp copy of the lists, I take an inexplicable joy in wielding a highlighter across them to see how many I have read. The necessity has also sadly developed in recent years to denote books on the lists that I have in my possession but have not yet had time to read so there’s also the added excitement of colour coding going on!

Sometimes it’s been scary to see how many I’ve not got around to reading – I like to think that I stay up to date with recent publications and this can be a bit of a wake up call – but for the most part it’s a welcome challenge. I’m fairly certain that I’m not going to manage to read them all, probably not even close, but past experience has taught me that these lists hold treasures and there’s genuine delight in the anticipation of what I’m going to find.

I’m already looking forward to the announcement of the longlists in February – highlighter at the ready!

You can see the full lists and award timetable on the CKG Website

Happy reading everyone!

Lizzie