CKG Review: The Song From Somewhere Else illustrated by Levi Pinfold

The reviews are coming thick and fast today as we prepare for tomorrow’s medal ceremony. Here Lizzie tells us her thoughts on The Song From Somewhere Else….

What the publisher says:

A poignant, darkly comic and deeply moving story about the power of the extraordinary, and finding friendship where you least expect it. Written by the author of the critically acclaimed The Imaginary and illustrated by award-winning illustrator Levi Pinfold,

https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/the-song-from-somewhere-else-9781408853368/

The Song From Somewhere Else

What we say: 

‘Dark, eerie and beautiful’ and ‘magical, earth-like and majestic’ both apt summations of this atmospheric book from my shadowers.

Indeed, it’s a book that’s captured a lot of attention within our shadowing group with lots of them clamouring to read it after looking at just the first few pages of illustrations (we used the Session 1 outline from the wonderful CLPE teaching sequence). For me it’s a book that I’ve continued to think about long after putting it down – and I think that the illustrations have a huge part to play in the way it’s lingered with me. The slightly smaller format, subtly gleaming front cover, nettle covered endpapers (even nettled covered boards if you have the hardback edition) and swirling title pages all tell you that you are reading something very special.

Immersive and atmospheric double page spreads communicate both the sense of wonder and dark menace that the story pivots on. There’s a filmic quality to the composition of many of the illustrations with pools of light and dark adding a frisson of danger and a use of scale which positions Frank so that she looks swamped by her surroundings – this is a town where the very sky looks like it could fall down and engulf you. Shadowy threats leach onto page edges and roll across the page – details which all sustain the atmosphere and tension.

My favourite illustrations, however, are those that depict Nick’s mother and her Troll music – she is both otherworldly and yet graceful – mountainous and delicate – and all the while surrounded by the wisps of her beautiful music. A beautiful depiction, regardless of her strangeness, of a mother.

All in all a perfect blending of words and pictures.

Lizzie

See Levi Pinfold talk about The Song From Somewhere Else here: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/watch.php?id=16

View the full CKG 2018 shortlists here:

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/carnegie-current-shortlist.php

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/greenaway-current-shortlist.php

 

 

 

 

 

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CKG Review: Thornhill by Pam Smy

As we near the end of our series of Carngeie and Greenaway reviews, Ann warns us of the perils of reading Greenaway shortlisted Thornhill just before bed!

What the publisher says: 

As she unpacks in her new bedroom, Ella is irresistibly drawn to the big old house that she can see out of her window. Surrounded by overgrown gardens, barbed wire fences and ‘keep out’ signs, it looks derelict.

But that night, a light goes on in one of the windows. And the next day she sees a girl in the grounds.

Ella is hooked. The house has a story to tell. She is sure of it.

http://www.davidficklingbooks.com/shop/ItemDetails.php?pubID=185

Thornhill Pam SmyWhat we say:

I read this last night just before I went to bed, big mistake !

Using a hybrid format of diary entries and illustrated sequences, Thornhill tells the story of two lonely girls across dual timelines. Full of ‘bullies, ghosts and creepy dolls’ (as one newspaper put it) – this contemporary Gothic tale leaves you with much to think about.

The  illustrated sequences have an eerie quality: As Mary’s story is revealed in heartbreaking diary entries, Ella’s exploration of the modern day Thornhill is told in silent monochromatic freeze frame. The effect can be deeply disturbing.

Empty black pages separate the written and illustrated sequences and divide the past from the present. They create a nice pause in between the two narratives, preventing the reader from rushing too quickly through the developing mystery – as with all good creepy tales pacing is everything!

Smy’s bold illustrative style combines observational drawing with a strong design aesthetic. Her imposing facades and lingering images of overgrown gardens (particularly the images used on the front cover and the endpapers) sit comfortably alongside incredibly detailed interiors and expressive character studies.

The overall feeling is cinematic and ominous. The atmospheric and emotional illustrations ooze tension and reward the reader with a suitably ambiguous climax and chilling denouement.

I’ve never read a book like it – totally absorbing!

Ann

Watch Pam Smy speaking about Thornhill on the CKG shadowing site: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/watch.php?id=15

You can view the full Carnegie and Kate Greenaway 2018 shortlists here:

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/carnegie-current-shortlist.php

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/greenaway-current-shortlist.php

CKG Review: Under the Same Sky by Britta Teckentrup

With the latest in our series of CKG reviews, here’s Lorna’s take on Under the Same Sky by Britta Teckentrup, which has been shortlisted for the Greenaway Medal.

What the publisher says…

Written and illustrated by the award-winning Britta Teckentrup, this beautiful and heart-warming peek-through picture book celebrates the closeness of the world’s communities through their shared hopes and dreams

http://littletiger.co.uk/under-the-same-sky-2?filter_name=under the same sky&filter_description=0

under the Same Sky

What we say…

Britta Teckentrup has done it again, a beautifully illustrated book with a heart-warming and poignant message.

The book takes us on a journey round the world, looking at different animals from across the globe. From the African Savannah to the Arctic Circle, from mountains to forests and seas to sky. Throughout the book the clever cut outs and glimpses to the next page remind us that no matter where we are in the world, we all share the same moon, sky and stars.

This is a lovely sensitive book for very young children and a great way of starting those conversations about tolerance and acceptance; by demonstrating that no matter where we live or what we look like we all ‘dream the same dreams and we dream them together’.

Britta’s books always bring a happy tear to my eye and this one does not disappoint.

Lorna

See Britta Teckentrup talking about Under the Same Sky on the CKG shadowing website: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/watch.php?id=9

View the full Carnegie and Kate Greenaway 2018 shortlists here:

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/carnegie-current-shortlist.php

http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/greenaway-current-shortlist.php

CKG Review: Night Shift by Debi Gliori

Every year at YLG Northwest we like to bring you our reviews of the Carnegie and Kate Greenaway shortlists – and with only four weeks to go until the announcement of this year’s winners, we thought that today would be the perfect time to start.

First up is Night Shift by Debi Gliori.

Night shift

What the publisher says…

With stunning black and white illustration and deceptively simple text, author and illustrator Debi Gliori examines how depression affects one’s whole outlook upon life, and shows that there can be an escape – it may not be easy to find, but it is there. Drawn from Debi’s own experiences and with a moving testimony at the end of the book explaining how depression has affected her and how she continues to cope, Debi hopes that by sharing her own experience she can help others who suffer from depression, and to find that subtle shift that will show the way out.

http://hotkeybooks.com/books/night-shift/

What we say…

This is a big step away from Gliori’s usual work. Through her exquisite talent for illustration she has managed to portray the struggle of depression when words simply don’t work. I can’t begin to describe how important this book is, mental health is being discussed more and more, but still not enough. With the building pressure that children, as well  as adults, find themselves surrounded by, books like this can help identify feelings of an illness that is so difficult to explain. No one should be left fighting dragons alone, and perhaps with more books like this we won’t have to. Thank you Debi Gliori.

Hazel

You can see Debi talking about Night Shift on the CKG Shadowing site here: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/watch.php?id=2

Shadowing The Greenaway: Our 5 Top Tips

Top tips for shadowing the Greenaway shortlist 2018

Sometimes playing second fiddle to its older sister the Carnegie Medal, the Greenaway should not be overlooked as an amazing way to engage readers regardless of age. With its focus on artistic quality and the visual experience of reading it is perfect for both toddler and teen.

We have five top tips for getting the most out of your shadowing experience.

Look CloserI cannot recommend the Reading Resources on the shadowing homepage enough. If you are new to  Greenaway Shadowing these should definitely be your first port of call. The Visual Literacy Guides are an excellent tool for guiding your shadowing group to look more closely at the illustrations as well as offering opportunities to explore the books within the context of the wider world. The reading prompts and questions will gently steer shadowers towards assessing the books against the judging criteria. With additional ideas for further research as well as creative prompts, you really can’t go wrong. Continue reading